How can your ecommerce store boost its customer retention rate in 2021?

Piranha Designs - Tuesday, January 12, 2021

The retail industry took a hit at the start of the pandemic – and, in a fashion, continues to do so as many companies are forced to keep their brick-and-mortar stores temporarily shut in line with lockdown restrictions. In sharp contrast, however, the COVID-19 era presents the world of ecommerce with a huge opportunity for growth.

Still, a big question is whether your online store can ensure what may have been its pandemic-sparked expansion lasts well into this New Year.

Regardless of how long the pandemic itself lingers in 2021, here are several strategies you could pursue to help keep your company’s ecommerce growth going.

Use the RFM model

The recency, frequency and monetary value (RFM) model enables you to classify customers on account of their shopping behaviour. One way to put it into practice is by assigning each of your customers a score from 1 to 5 on the measures of how recently they have bought, how often and the average monetary value of their orders.

So, a customer who scores 555 should probably be in line for VIP treatment, while one with a 255 score may be tempted back to your online shop by an automated email or text message.

Use customer onboarding to build relationships

Customer onboarding can work with both new customers and those whose transactional habits at your online store have waned. In either instance, though, your objective would be to foster a relationship that encourages the customer to buy repeatedly from you in the longer term.

So, while onboarding for a new customer might involve them registering an account with your online store and subscribing to its content, trying to win back a former customer could entail messaging them privately to thank them for their last order and offering them a discount code redeemable on a future order.

Regularly publish fresh content to keep shoppers... content

How many times have you seen, in your email inbox, a message focused on a specific product? The mere sight of this kind of message has probably made you think “not spam again”. That’s why your marketing campaigns can’t be limited to product-specific pieces like these.

While it would not always be of the best use to your customers, content that touches on pain points in their everyday lives would come across as much less self-publicising. This content can comprise articles and videos, for which we can help you to select the right keywords.

Keyword research and guest blogging are among the services we include as standard with our search engine marketing (SEM) packages here at Piranha Designs. We can help you to choose between our Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum packages if you directly reach out to us in the UK or Gibraltar.

How your online store can get its Christmas social media approach just right

Piranha Designs - Thursday, December 10, 2020

You might be thinking it’s a little late for us to be telling you every detail of how you should plan your e-tail shop’s festive-season social media strategy, and you’d be right. Hopefully, you’ll have the key planks of such seasonal plans put down already.

However, it might still be handy for you to do a ‘check-up’ of your brand’s approach to social media this Christmas, before you launch the full campaign in earnest.

So, here are some of the key factors to be thinking about – or reminding yourself of – at this late stage.

Is your brand’s social media campaign well-aligned with its broader goals?

Whatever your business’s goals are for its social media channels, now is the time to re-familiarise yourself with them, as you’re planning your posts on the likes of Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for the month or so ahead.

And of course, those goals may well differ from platform to platform. It might be that your brand has a presence on certain social media sites largely to increase brand awareness, while on others, you may be seeking to distribute authoritative and useful content for your target audience, or to acquire new customers.

Whatever – you need to be sure of what your e-tailer’s precise goals are for each social platform, and to plan your seasonal social posts accordingly.

In the process, do what you can to make those goals SMART – specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound.

What is your social editorial calendar looking like?

The above goals will all be important when you’re putting together an editorial calendar for your brand’s social media presence. Such an editorial calendar should consist of a list of exactly what will be published on each of your social channels, and when.

By now, you ought to have this publishing plan already set out for the rest of 2020. So, have another look now at the mix of what you intend to post.

Does your editorial calendar look a little too heavy on one type of content, for example – such as memes or links to ‘how to’ blog articles – when considered alongside your aforementioned broader goals and the audience you have on that given social media channel?

Do you have a strong sense of who your audience is?

Every social network on which your brand is present should provide insightful statistics about your audience. So, before your Christmas social media marketing campaign gets significantly underway, it’s well worth spending a few minutes checking whether the actual audience you’re addressing on your social profiles is consistent with the one you think you’re aiming at.

If your store sells men’s products, for instance, you may be surprised by how strongly women are represented in your follower base on a specific platform like Facebook.

There are several reasons why this may arise. Your Facebook updates may not be very well-matched to what social content men are looking for in your sector, or your products might be largely purchased by women as gifts for the men in their lives.

You can determine what the situation is for your own brand by keeping a close eye on the demographics of your social followers on specific platforms, encompassing their age, gender, location, occupation and interests – among other things. This will then have implications for the exact social content that you produce.

Here at Piranha Designs, we provide social setup expertise as part of our top-level Platinum search engine optimisation and marketing package. It’s one of the key elements that will help you to get your ecommerce outlet noticed for the right reasons online. So, why wait any longer to talk about it with our UK and Gibraltar-based web marketing professionals?

5 steps to boost your appeal to festive shoppers in 2020

Piranha Designs - Thursday, October 08, 2020

It won’t exactly be news to any members of your ecommerce brand’s team – or any of its customers – that 2020 has been a year like no other, although sadly largely in the negative sense. But of course, that simply makes a bit of well-judged Christmas cheer more crucial than ever, which is something your online store can play a part in delivering.

Below are some of our favourite tips for how e-tailers can capitalise on the strange times of the 2020 festive season with their online marketing and sales strategies.

Have a dedicated Christmas section

Of course, we were always going to start with the “obvious” advice, which is as relevant as it is in part because so many merchants actually overlook it.

It’s not necessarily an arduous task to re-jig an existing special section of your online store – the Halloween page, for example – to house and promote Christmas-related items such as festive decorations and chocolate boxes.

You might just be switching out some products and suitably renaming the page, not to mention replacing any links to this page on the homepage and navigation bar.

Be empathetic to your customers

Ask anyone, and it seems that we’re practically all stressed and fed up about at least something at the minute. We wish the pandemic was over already, and we’re fretting about our health and financial situations, and/or those of our loved ones. Other ongoing global events, such as the US election and Brexit situation, will also be causing stress – whatever your customers’ political views may be.

So, if there’s one thing your store should be, it’s supportive to its customers at an angst-ridden and uncertain time. Be the brand that represents the metaphorical shoulder to cry on, by training your staff to handle customer concerns with sensitivity and heart, even when only selling online.

Underline home comforts and conveniences

Whether or not your ecommerce brand also has a high-street presence, a significant proportion of your customers will probably resent still having to spend so much time at home, so long after the COVID-19 crisis first hit Europe in the spring.

But this does present your store with an opportunity to show that an almost exclusively home-based life can be an experience, too. Consider, then, what items your store specialises in that may be particularly relevant for domestic use – think everything from books, blankets and loungewear to home smart speakers, gift hampers and bathroom products.

Tap into the trends of the COVID-19 era

We all know that the pandemic has upended our world and lives, so why wouldn’t it have a similarly dramatic impact on what kind of items people wish to buy during the Christmas season?

Given the economic chaos the coronavirus has visited upon us, it shouldn’t surprise you that high-end luxury goods have already been de-emphasised in many stores’ marketing campaigns this year. In their place, we’ve seen much attention drawn to gifts that are unique, but also immediate sources of joy and comfort in the home at this trying time.

Encourage customers to connect virtually

We aren’t just talking here about how those shopping with you may reach out to your team via email, ‘live chat’ or Facebook Messenger – although this aspect of your service is certainly crucial at a time when your customers won’t want to be left waiting for a response.

That’s because we’re also referring to the myriad ways in which families, friends and colleagues may keep communication lines open with each other as the winter wears on.

Perhaps you could highlight the fashion and makeup products of your brand that could help your shoppers to look and feel good on camera, or the food and wine items that might represent excellent choices for a ‘virtual’ family tea or snack?


Are there ambitions and possibilities for the design or redesign of your e-tail store’s website, or its SEO or PPC marketing, that you would like to discuss in greater detail with the Piranha Designs team? If so, you’re welcome to reach out to us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh now.

5 tips for getting your category pages in shape for the search engines

Piranha Designs - Monday, September 28, 2020

The category pages on an ecommerce site are often overlooked from a search engine optimisation (SEO) perspective, despite the fact that they routinely already target and contain keywords that customers frequently search for. So, what further steps can you take to bolster your category pages’ rankings for those often highly competitive keywords?

Begin with the metadata

You can barely claim to have optimised your online store’s category pages if you leave the title tags and meta descriptions untouched. Such metadata will always be at the forefront of any responsible and informed efforts to improve SEO – so be sure to incorporate relevant keywords into them, and a ‘call to action’ (CTA) at the end of each meta description.Also try to keep the length of your title tags and meta descriptions within Google’s character limits – 60 and 160 characters respectively.

Use relevant headings

The title tag and meta description, while crucial to on-page SEO, are hidden away in the page’s HTML, and aren’t visible on the category page itself. The headings, though – with their tags like H1, H2 and so on – very much are clear to see on the actual page. So these, too, need to be relevant. A good rule of thumb is to use the H1 heading – which is typically the primary heading at the top of the page – to reinforce the theme you put in your title tag, referring to the overall subject of the entire page. This might be followed by H2 and H3 subheadings to represent supporting themes on the page.

Incorporate body text

Not everyone actually likes the idea of using body copy on an ecommerce site’s category page, with some preferring to leave imagery of the relevant products to ‘do the talking’ by itself. However, if you want your online store to do well in the organic search rankings, you really can’t do without at least some text in the body of each category page, even if you merely settle for a sentence or two. Carefully choose just one or two descriptive keywords that naturally fit with the copy, and you won’t need to write paragraph after paragraph for your body content if you don’t wish to do so.

Aim for relevant link text

Some ecommerce stores attempting to optimise their category pages often end up committing the classic error of using link text – such as ‘click here’ or ‘find out more’ – that is useless from an SEO point of view.So, consider the opportunities you have with your link text – including in the aforementioned body copy – to send relevance signals to the search engines, such as by referring to specific products or subcategories of products.

Include links in the header and footer

Sure, your site’s header and footer are the same across your site, so you might not see this as a tip for optimising your category pages, so to speak. However, your site’s header and footer do represent useful space in which to perhaps incorporate links to some of the most valuable category and subcategory pages.With Christmas looming in just a few months, for instance, you might take the chance now to link to your festive-season category page, in time to attract the attention of both search engine spiders and human users on the lookout for the best deals on Yuletide gifts.Just make sure you don’t overdo it with the header and footer links; trying to link to all of your ecommerce store’s category or subcategory pages here will not come across well to human shoppers, and will be over-optimised from a search algorithm point of view.

If you would like to discuss your requirements in ecommerce website design or SEO marketing in greater detail, the Piranha Designs team is available at the other end of a phone or email inbox. Don’t wait any longer to get in touch with us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh.

Mimic Amazon by making these 3 changes to your e-tail site’s product pages

Piranha Designs - Tuesday, July 07, 2020

The statistics certainly don’t lie about Amazon’s continued staggering dominance of today’s ecommerce market; the tech titan may have started off as a bookseller in the early days of the World Wide Web, but by 2018, its annual net sales in the UK alone amounted to a staggering 14.5 billion US dollars. It was also reported last year that almost nine in 10 UK shoppers use the site.

What does all of this say about how your own ecommerce store responds to Amazon? Well, it certainly suggests you could learn a few lessons from them.

So, here are a few steps that you might take to make your site’s product pages that bit more ‘Amazon-esque’ – for the better.

Make your product names as descriptive as possible

Of course, Amazon is effectively its own search engine – people are constantly using its search function to type in the names of products that they’re looking for. Accordingly, merchants compete hard to rank their products as highly as possible in Amazon’s search results.

A strategy that such sellers therefore often adopt, is loading the names of their products with highly descriptive and specific text, to help them to reach those prospective buyers who really are looking for that red, stainless steel, 1.7-litre, electric kettle.

What you might not have realised, though, is that it’s a method that could also greatly help your own ecommerce store’s products to rank highly in Google. Adding a few modifiers – such as colour, size, material and so on – to your product page names could go a long way to helping you to target the prospective purchasers who’re most likely to be interested in them.

Flesh out your product descriptions

It might seem to go without saying that if your product page titles are highly descriptive, the actual descriptions further down the page probably should be, too.

However, you might not have consciously noticed how Amazon makes good use of both bullet points and longer-form text descriptions on its product pages. Both of these aspects of a product page can be instrumental in informing Google of the relevance of the product for the searches that human users might perform for certain items.

Bullet points, of course, are highly ‘scannable’, which makes them great for quickly drawing attention to the key features and benefits of a product. Well-written extended text, however, can also considerably boost contextual search relevance, at the same time as helping human users who land on the given page.

Allow for user-generated content

How many of us haven’t found a review by an actual buyer of a given product helpful for informing our decision as to whether to purchase? More recently, questions and answers have also been added to Amazon’s product pages. Both of these features enable Amazon – and other online stores like your own – to use shoppers’ own language to augment the information already on the page and bolster the page’s chances of ranking well.

We’d add a caveat here, though: not all user-generated content will necessarily be good for the SEO of your e-tail store’s product pages. If such content is poor quality, irrelevant or outright spammy, the page’s relevance signals may become muddled, thereby undermining its ability to rank.

So, it’s a very good idea to have someone moderating the reviews your products receive. You might even go further in the Amazon-imitating stakes in this regard, by allowing shoppers to indicate which reviews they find most helpful. This means that the highest-rated reviews can be pinned to the top of the list – in the process, denying a prominent position to lower-quality reviews.

Would you like to learn more about the breadth and depth of the ecommerce web design and SEO marketing expertise we could bring to your own brand? If so, the Piranha Designs team is available on the other end of a phone or email inbox, whether you contact us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh.

How to foster trust among your online customers as coronavirus lockdowns loosen

Piranha Designs - Friday, June 05, 2020

There are welcoming signs of life beginning to return to some kind of ‘normal’ in the UK and across the world as the grim numbers associated with the COVID-19 pandemic gradually recede. But it’s not just brick-and-mortar businesses that need to prepare for a somewhat changed post-crisis landscape, as ecommerce stores will also have a lot to think about.

Indeed, the slowly brightening outlook means your store should probably be shifting its focus from its earlier lockdown ‘emergency’ measures to considerations of how you can cultivate longer-term loyalty from the customers you might have gained during this difficult period.

In order to do that, you’ll need to reassure them that your store is a trustworthy one, so that you can continue to attract their custom for months and years to come. Here are a few ways to accomplish exactly that.

Avoid any price hikes that you can’t explain or justify

Of course, not all retail businesses will have felt ‘on hold’ during the pandemic. The lockdown experience of a food or sanitary products seller, for example, is likely to have differed significantly from that of a high-end clothes label.

However, if you are in the fortunate position of stocking essential items, you should endeavour to maintain pricing of these at pre-pandemic levels. If price increases do need to happen, you should be careful to explain why, as even mere accusations of price gouging could hit your brand’s reputation.

Remove as much friction as possible from the checkout process

Many people will still be self-isolating, whether they have COVID-19 symptoms or are simply in a vulnerable demographic. These people will be especially reliant on online retail; for this reason, you won’t want to lumber them with an overlong and cumbersome checkout process.

These days, mobile payment systems such as Apple Pay can be built into online checkouts to enable shoppers to pay for their goods with a single tap or glance. This saves customers from having to register an account with the store in question, or even to manually type in their payment details, which will already be saved on their device.

Empathise with your audience

Difficulties related to the virus and the associated lockdown restrictions are clearly still widespread, which is why your customers might want particular reassurance that you will deliver them the items they need even as your own firm’s pressures start to bite.

Still, if your business isn’t serving high-end professionals, you should probably avoid using such phrases as “supply chain interruptions” or even – shudder – “unprecedented”. Instead, use simple, to-the-point terms like “we know times are confusing right now” or “our suppliers are working around the clock”.

If you aren’t a natural with written content, take heart that our SEO work includes the composition of blog posts that can keep your visitors updated on how your business is adjusting itself in the rapidly changing circumstances we’re all having to deal with right now.

Indeed, here at Piranha Designs, we possess wide-ranging website design and digital marketing expertise that could play an integral role in your ecommerce store’s efforts to thrive in the post-pandemic world. So why not contact us directly today to learn more?

Why you shouldn’t skip having an FAQs page on your ecommerce site

Piranha Designs - Tuesday, May 05, 2020

If there’s one part of an online store that can be especially prone to being forgotten by many merchants, it might just be the FAQs page. ‘FAQs’, of course, stands for ‘frequently asked questions’, and you’ve almost certainly found this section of a website useful in the past.

Unfortunately, all too many online business owners are inclined to dismiss the potential relevance of such a page on their own site. Often, this may be because they presume all of their customers’ queries are likely to have already been answered elsewhere on the site.

So, here are just a few reasons why you should consider an FAQs page to be not only useful or important, but essential.

It saves time for everyone

If the customer is struggling to find information on your website on such vital matters as how your firm packages its goods for delivery or how your products can be used, guess what? Presuming they don’t simply exit your site and cost you the potential sale altogether, there’s a good chance that they’ll get in touch with your support staff directly, consuming both their and your time and energy.

It’s so needless, when you can just have an easy-to-understand FAQs page instead – especially given that there are almost certainly questions your customers will be constantly asking.

It makes the shopper feel less alone

We’ve all had those times in life when we’ve worried that we’re the weird ones, and that we’re the only ones who’re confused by a particular subject. Just think of the last time your friends or colleagues cracked a joke, and you were the only one who didn’t ‘get it’... you won’t want to leave your customers feeling like that.

Addressing common questions explicitly in an FAQs format can validate the shopper’s query, making them realise that they aren’t alone in having a particular thought or question about your brand, products or services.

It builds positive and long-lasting relationships

Think of all of the characteristics you’ll want target shoppers to associate with your ecommerce store... like trustworthiness, transparency, honesty, responsiveness and professionalism. A well-sorted FAQs page can increase the extent to which both long-time customers and casual visitors connect you in their heads to all of these things.

Having a frequently asked questions section, then, isn’t just a way of answering a few random questions and helping out a customer or two. It’s also about presenting a clear picture of your store as one that genuinely cares and is there for the customer, with nothing to hide.

Furthermore, the sheer amount of useful information on your FAQs page could be instrumental in keeping the customer on your site for longer, and more confident in deciding to buy from you, instead of hitting that ‘back’ button on their browser window.

So, you now know that an FAQs page is important – but how can you put together an effective one for your own site? Get in touch with the Piranha Designs team today, and we can incorporate such a page for you into our extensive design or redesign of your ecommerce website.

A few tips for nabbing those late, late Christmas shoppers

Piranha Designs - Monday, December 16, 2019

If you’re not exactly the kind of person who suffers from procrastination, or you’re simply in the habit of always finishing your Christmas gift-buying by the 1st of December, you might find it hard to get your head around how so many other shoppers leave it so late to make their purchases.

Nonetheless, the most important thing to recognise is that these shoppers definitely exist, which means they’re there to be captured by ecommerce stores like yours.

But with the last Saturday before Christmas falling on the 21st this year, you’ll have to act fast to optimise your site if it’s not completely geared to the preferences and needs of these late shoppers. So, here are just a few simple steps you can take to lure such procrastinators.

Offer express delivery

This might seem like some of the most obvious advice we could give. However, you may be surprised by how many online stores prioritise affordability with their delivery offering, to such an extent that the speed and reliability of this service suffers.

Sure, price won’t completely cease to be a priority for most late shoppers – but above all else, they’ll want to know that their order will get to them in time. So, a lot of them won’t mind heightened shipping costs, as long as they aren’t ridiculously inflated compared to those of rival stores.

Highlight gift guides and bestselling items

One reason why a given late shopper may have procrastinated in the first place, is a simple difficulty with choosing a gift. It might therefore only require a well-written guide to gift shopping, and a few highlights of ideal presents for certain categories of customer – dads, mums, brothers and so on – to give them that vital inspiration to go ahead and make a spontaneous purchase.

Including some obvious unfussy ‘stocking fillers’ in these guides – modest, lightweight items that can be delivered quickly and cheaply – and allowing for easy filtering by price will likely further convince those dithering potential customers of yours to just buy already.

Be razor-sharp with your replies to customers

Whether they get in touch with you via phone, email, social media or even by commenting on your YouTube videos, when these anxious late shoppers ask you a question, they probably won’t be able to afford you only getting back in touch with them in 12 or 24 hours’ time. Always responding within 20 minutes is much more the kind of timeframe you should be aiming for.

Streamline the checkout process

As Christmas Day nears, you’ve got more reason than ever to review your site’s checkout process afresh. This is the ideal time to turn off every single strictly unnecessary element, so that your already-rushed shoppers won’t be left feeling even more stressed by a frivolous pop-up or your store demanding that they register an account with you.

Yes, dealing with procrastinators can be frustrating. But it also represents a key business opportunity for your online store – not just for the festive season, but potentially for months and years’ worth of future purchases – if you make all of the right moves to convenience them.

As for the longer-term ambitions you have for the design of your ecommerce website, why not get in touch with the Piranha Designs team to discuss them in more detail? That way, we, too, could be looking forward to a fruitful long-term relationship that extends through many Christmases to come.

Your site won’t rank well if Google doesn’t even consider it a high-quality one

Piranha Designs - Monday, September 23, 2019

You might not exactly need to be told that Google places a big emphasis on ‘quality’ when adjusting the algorithms that ultimately determine how well sites rank in its search results. But how, exactly, does Google define ‘quality’? Well, that’s been a matter of longstanding confusion and frustration among many online business owners.

A recent Google blog post, however, shed considerable light on what the search engine considers to be ‘quality’ in a website.

Indeed, it listed a series of questions for those optimising their sites with a view to getting them to rank well, across the four subcategories of “content and quality”, “expertise”, “presentation and production” and “comparative”.

So, let’s summarise what Google addressed in the questions it came up with, so that you can make the tweaks your own site might need to achieve strong rankings.

Content and quality

Google’s questions in this subcategory – including “Does the content provide a substantial, complete or comprehensive description of the topic?” and “Would you expect to see this content in or referenced by a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book” – show a concern for genuine quality in the content that a given site publishes.

If your site’s content pieces thoroughly analyse relevant topics from multiple angles, incorporating original information or research beyond the obvious things that plenty of other sites are already saying, you can expect Google to give you high rankings in response.

Expertise

It isn’t exactly a secret that Google places a big emphasis on authority when ranking sites, and that this has been addressed in its algorithms, with inbound links conferring authority based on the linking sites’ own topic and quality.

However, your site’s content and the authors who write it also impact on your site’s authority in the eyes of Google. Do the people writing your content, then, have positive reputations and prominence in your industry? Are they active on other sites and platforms like LinkedIn and Twitter, and are they regulars on relevant industry forums?

If the answer to too many of these questions is “no”, these are aspects that you might wish to develop in the authors who contribute to your site.

Presentation and production

If Google is even addressing the subjects of presentation and production in its definition of quality, these can hardly be regarded as merely ‘superficial’ matters.

In any case, they should never have been considered to be ‘superficial’ by anyone. After all, should you expect to be able to win the trust of both shoppers and search engines if there are misspellings or grammatical errors on your site?

In its blog piece, Google presented a number of presentation and production questions that were especially interesting with regard to what could trigger manual penalties or lower algorithmic rankings.

These included “Does the content have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content”, and “Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?”

Comparative

Finally, Google also put forth a few comparative questions, focused on how well a site compares to its rivals in terms of quality.

It’s well worth bearing in mind, after all, that your site doesn’t need to be perfect to achieve strong rankings – it just needs to be better than the sites it’s competing with for certain keyword phrases.

Is SEO quality a subject that has been concerning you as you look to optimise your site for better rankings in the months and years ahead? If so, don’t hesitate to get in touch with the Piranha Designs team.

We provide acclaimed search engine marketing packages that will help your brand to ensure consistently great quality across every key aspect of its presence on the web.

How can a great user experience go hand in hand with great SEO?

Piranha Designs - Thursday, July 11, 2019

Are you constantly doing seemingly ‘all of the right things’ with the optimisation of your website for the search engines, only to find the high rankings you’ve worked so hard to achieve aren’t even bringing you a noticeable uplift in sales and loyal customers... that is, if your rankings are even climbing at all?

If so, your big problem may be that you’ve overlooked the crucial connection between user experience – or ‘UX’, as it’s frequently referred to in web design and development circles – and SEO.

You see, the two things have a very intimate relationship. Just imagine having two equally renowned high-street stores to choose from for a particular product, with the item being priced the same in both places... except that at one store, the staff are so much nicer, more responsive to your queries and more informative when answering your questions.

In theory, you might still buy the product at the ‘other’ store... but it’s the one that provides an especially great experience that you are especially likely to purchase the item from.

So, how does effect manifest for ecommerce stores?

Let’s continue with the offline analogy for a bit. You go to said brilliant store, you buy the product, you’re satisfied and you go back to that store again and again in the future, consistently benefitting from a brilliant service. You tell your friends and relatives how good this store is, and the store gains such a reputation that it is featured prominently in local directories, newspapers and magazines.

Well, there’s a similar thing going on for online stores that provide a superb user experience.

These sites don’t suffer from such high ‘bounce rates’ – the online store equivalent of someone heading into a shop, and then going straight back out again – while the more pleasurable browsing and buying experience for visitors lends itself to heightened ratings, referrals and inbound links.

A few quick ways to bolster your UX – and with it, your SEO

OK, so you might turn to Piranha Designs to undertake more in-depth optimisation of your site’s user experience – but here are a few quick tips to give you some inspiration and ideas. You might want to try...

  • Ensuring your site’s internal links are to pages that are genuinely relevant and useful for shoppers – there’s little point in linking to the page you’re already on, for example
  • Optimising for faster page loading times, in light of the Google study that showed conversions fell by 12% for every second of load time
  • Giving customers an equally pleasurable experience on mobile and desktop, in recognition of the fact that more than half of Google’s global search results are served from its mobile-first index
  • Going into greater depth with your content. Be careful here – length alone won’t translate into higher rankings, but content that is genuinely more informative and useful for visitors than what your rivals are serving up might well do
  • Targeting keyword themes and words that fit in well with what you’re offering to the customer, instead of being intended purely to drive search volume

Get in touch today with the Piranha Designs team at our Gibraltar, Edinburgh or London offices, and we’d be delighted to talk to you about our website design and SEO services that will help you to maximise your site’s user experience and with it, your brand’s online fortunes.


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