Do the physical locations of your ecommerce customers really matter?

Piranha Designs - Thursday, March 05, 2020

While some observers might think the answer to this question would be automatically “no”, geography does make a difference to ecommerce conversions – and there are various ways your own online store could make the most of the locations your customers are shopping from.

You’re probably already broadly aware of the counties, regions or even other countries where your shoppers reside. Buyers need to provide this information about themselves at the checkout stage, and it can also be seen in Google Analytics when Enhanced Ecommerce is enabled.

It’s much less likely, however, that you will have given much thought to how you could incorporate geographical variables into your marketing campaigns. By first knowing how to evaluate which locations are performing best with regard to such factors as sales, number of transactions and profitability, you’ll be able to target audiences with your marketing much more effectively.

As for what causes what might be very significant performance differences from one region to another, below are some of the factors to bear in mind – and how your brand might adjust its marketing approaches accordingly.

  • Marketing costs. It might cost you more to reach a customer from, for example, London, than from York, such as if you are running a Google Ads campaign. So, if you know your total sales and marketing cost for each region, you might calculate the relative cost per conversion for each of those localities, and therefore profitability. It may be that you get more transactions from your London customers, for example, but that your York shoppers give you greater overall profit.
  • Products. The products or product types of yours that are most popular might noticeably vary from one region to another. Even drilling down to certain product attributes such as colour, size and materials, you may see significantly differing preferences, which could have big implications for your regional marketing efforts.
  • Population. Touching a bit on what we said above, you might gain more sales from certain cities, towns or regions, simply because they are the most populous. That’s why you might gain greater insight into the true levels of demand for your products on a region-by-region basis, if you divide the number of customers in each region by its total population. When you do, you may find that you’re getting poor value for money out of your marketing in one locality, but that you could benefit from upping your marketing spend in other regions.
  • Household income. You’re likely to get a greater lifetime value (LTV) out of customers situated in geographical areas where the level of disposable household income is higher. So, checking which regions command the highest average household income could help you to direct your marketing towards more profitable localities. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), for example, indicate that as of 2017, London had gross disposable household income (GDHI) per head of £27,825 on average; the equivalent figure for Wales, meanwhile, was a much lower £15,754.

When we draw attention to the above geographical factors, we aren’t saying that other demographics – such as age and gender – aren’t important. Those factors should be considered by ecommerce site owners as well, and can provide even greater insight into the customer buying patterns that help the savviest merchants to direct their marketing expenditure more effectively.

Give the Piranha Designs team a call now, whether at our Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh offices, and we’ll be pleased to have a chat with you about our various website design, SEO and marketing services that could make a significant difference to your brand’s success in 2020.

Are you adequately considering how and where customers use your mobile ecommerce site?

Piranha Designs - Friday, February 21, 2020

A key element of the website design process, is that of broadly assuming various ways, contexts and settings in which someone might use the site in question. But have you given enough thought to how these scenarios may vary when it comes to visitors to your mobile site?

Generally speaking, any given time someone visits your mobile ecommerce site, one of three scenarios is likely to be the case: they’re probably waiting for something to happen, on a break at work, or relaxing at home.

These different situations have varying implications for users’ experience of the site, why they are visiting in the first place, what problems they are looking to solve, and how you can capture them.

What do we mean by ‘waiting for something to happen’?

You’ve probably found yourself in this situation plenty of times yourself, when you’ve suddenly come up with an idea for something, and performed a Google search for a related term.

In this scenario, the user is only typically focusing for about five to 10 minutes, and isn’t interested in actually buying a product – or at least, not right now. Instead, they’re simply putting together a mental list of ideas, perhaps including potential stores and products for their given problem.

To appeal to these visitors, then, you’ll need to provide them with obvious opportunities to connect with you – via social media or email, for instance – in ways that don’t involve actually purchasing a product.

Then, once they have connected with you in one or more of these ways, you will be able to more easily reconnect them on future occasions when they are considering buying.

Then, there are those work break-time situations...

Many of us are familiar with those potentially dull break or lunch-times in the office. We want a bit of inspiration or escapism – something to lift the boredom after a tough work shift or conversation with a colleague. A person in this scenario is looking for something to excite them, and that they can follow up on later.

This type of visitor to your mobile site probably won’t have a specific goal in mind. So, you might engage these potential customers with something like a ‘new ideas’ or ‘discovery’ section of your site, regularly updated with new products or suggestions.

...and those idle moments at home

Finally, there’s the kind of visitor who ends up on your site during what may be the quietest time of their day. Think of those people who may be sat in front on their sofa at home with a football match in the background, but who’re also idly browsing ecommerce stores on their smartphone, looking for that product they may have been recently thinking about.

Now, this is the type of customer who is likely to be interested in actually buying in the moment. So for you, this situation may well be about completing the sale, instead of merely relieving their boredom or giving them some inspiration.

Such customers are likelier to ‘go in for the kill’ with a purchase if your site is quick-loading, responsive, informative and convenient to use. So, don’t just focus on optimising loading times – also make sure you have a facility for capturing and updating reviews, of both your products and your site in general, that will help to move the relaxed visitor closer to that ‘buy’ button.

When such reviews are further complemented by an easy-to-refer-to list of accepted payment methods for a purchase and the ability to ‘save’ a shopping cart, you’ll be maximising the probability of the chilled-out shopper at home actually buying.

Remember that if you have any other questions or concerns about how your brand can get the most out of its own mobile e-tail presence in 2020, the Piranha Designs team is always ready and waiting to provide advice from our offices in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh. Or why not request a competitive quote for our complete ground-up mobile website design service?

How might you tweak your mobile site search this festive shopping season?

Piranha Designs - Friday, November 29, 2019

This time of year is inevitably one when ecommerce sites like yours will be flooded with traffic from those looking to purchase Christmas gifts – and do you know what feature will particularly help them to narrow down the options your store offers, thereby taking them one step closer to converting?

Yep, that’s right; a ‘site search’ function. Indeed, even if you have such a facility on your site already, there’s always scope to improve it – especially if a large proportion of your visitors are discovering your site via their smartphones.

Mobile site search isn’t quite the same as desktop site search

Now, it’s important to appreciate that getting your mobile site search right doesn’t involve simply doing all of the things you would do to improve your desktop site search, merely on a smaller screen.

After all, there are certain issues applicable to mobile site search that don’t apply, as strongly or at all, to desktop site search – particularly given the frequently ‘on the go’ nature of the mobile experience.

On a desktop site, for instance, it’s likely that any site-search feature will include a visible, open search box, like the one that greets you whenever you load up Google. But on the much smaller screen of a mobile, this may be an ill-advised use of limited space, thereby making it wiser for you to simply include a search icon – usually a magnifying glass – for the visitor to tap.

Another thing that’s really important with mobile site search is to ensure everything loads nice and quickly. Many of your smartphone-wielding visitors may be using the often iffy Wi-Fi connections in public places like bus and railway stations, so it’s a good idea to optimise the images that appear in mobile search on your site to be as lightweight as possible.

What other steps might you take to optimise site-search results?

There’s a lot more than the above that you can do to make the mobile site-search experience on your site feel as effortless and convenient as it should be.

The search results page should certainly be one key focus for optimisation, given how slow and cumbersome these can often be on mobile. Good tips here include restricting search results to 20 items at a time to shorten loading times, while also enabling endless scrolling.

The latter means that instead of the shopper needing to load a new results page once they’ve reached the end of those aforementioned 20 items, a further 20 items will automatically appear as they scroll down.

Oh, and you might want to eliminate relatively superfluous information, like ratings, from your mobile search results as well. As a general rule, it’s a good idea to just stick to absolutely essential information here, such as the product name and price – again, in the name of bolstering usability and loading speeds.

There’s so much more that we could do for your site experience

As mobile continues to play an ever-more fundamental role in how prospective customers engage with ecommerce brands like yours online, it’s never been more crucial to refine every last detail of the experience your site gives to smartphone and tablet users.

This is precisely what we can help you with here at Piranha Designs – so why wait any longer to contact us about our knowhow in the finer points of ecommerce and mobile website design?

The benefits Google’s BERT update could bring for your ecommerce store’s product pages

Piranha Designs - Thursday, October 31, 2019

It may be easy to become overwhelmed by the abundance of acronyms in the world of SEO (‘SEO’ itself being just one of them), but that doesn’t mean Google’s recently released BERT algorithm should be ignored.

Indeed, this particular open-source update – its letters standing for the rather catchy Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers – could be a particularly significant one for your ecommerce site’s product pages, given its focus on better understanding the intent of search queries.

So, what does BERT actually do?

Reading the above, you may wonder whether BERT is the replacement for RankBrain, which was Google’s 2015 effort to understand searcher intent. As it happens, it isn’t a replacement, with the two instead working simultaneously to decode what a user means when they perform a particular search, and giving them more relevant results accordingly.

While it isn’t the only thing that BERT does, a particular strength of the update compared to previous ones is the more sophisticated way it evaluates prepositions like “to” and “with”.

Among the examples Google provided of how BERT makes a difference was the query “2019 brazil traveller to usa needs visa”.

As human readers, we can easily understand that the person performing this search was probably someone from Brazil enquiring about how to obtain a visa to the United States. However, search results pre-BERT would also provide pages for US citizens interested in travelling to Brazil, which would obviously not meet the requirements of this specific searcher.

What should all of this mean for your ecommerce site?

Such an improved understanding of prepositions could have real positive implications for an ecommerce store wishing to attract more targeted traffic through long-tail queries.

After all, users looking for particular products online often include many specific details in their queries. Searches that use lots of such details and prepositions – for example, “red record player with speakers” or “basswood window shutters with green finish” – are likely to yield a higher proportion of truly relevant results now that BERT has arrived.

Now is the time, then, to consider how you can adjust your ecommerce site’s SEO to make the most of BERT. This should be the case across not only the product detail pages themselves, but also the filtered product grids that arise on your site due to the wealth of product attributes, such as colour, size and material, that you allow shoppers to toggle between when searching.

By citing a greater number of more specific attributes on your product pages and elsewhere around your site, you can help to put your ecommerce store in a strong position to tap into the power of BERT as you look to the busy festive shopping season and beyond.

In fact, why not have a more detailed discussion about this and other aspects of your site’s SEO with our search marketing professionals here at Piranha Designs today? It’s easy to contact us via our Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh offices, and it could help to make a big difference to the effectiveness of your brand’s online presence in the months and years ahead.

Your site won’t rank well if Google doesn’t even consider it a high-quality one

Piranha Designs - Monday, September 23, 2019

You might not exactly need to be told that Google places a big emphasis on ‘quality’ when adjusting the algorithms that ultimately determine how well sites rank in its search results. But how, exactly, does Google define ‘quality’? Well, that’s been a matter of longstanding confusion and frustration among many online business owners.

A recent Google blog post, however, shed considerable light on what the search engine considers to be ‘quality’ in a website.

Indeed, it listed a series of questions for those optimising their sites with a view to getting them to rank well, across the four subcategories of “content and quality”, “expertise”, “presentation and production” and “comparative”.

So, let’s summarise what Google addressed in the questions it came up with, so that you can make the tweaks your own site might need to achieve strong rankings.

Content and quality

Google’s questions in this subcategory – including “Does the content provide a substantial, complete or comprehensive description of the topic?” and “Would you expect to see this content in or referenced by a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book” – show a concern for genuine quality in the content that a given site publishes.

If your site’s content pieces thoroughly analyse relevant topics from multiple angles, incorporating original information or research beyond the obvious things that plenty of other sites are already saying, you can expect Google to give you high rankings in response.

Expertise

It isn’t exactly a secret that Google places a big emphasis on authority when ranking sites, and that this has been addressed in its algorithms, with inbound links conferring authority based on the linking sites’ own topic and quality.

However, your site’s content and the authors who write it also impact on your site’s authority in the eyes of Google. Do the people writing your content, then, have positive reputations and prominence in your industry? Are they active on other sites and platforms like LinkedIn and Twitter, and are they regulars on relevant industry forums?

If the answer to too many of these questions is “no”, these are aspects that you might wish to develop in the authors who contribute to your site.

Presentation and production

If Google is even addressing the subjects of presentation and production in its definition of quality, these can hardly be regarded as merely ‘superficial’ matters.

In any case, they should never have been considered to be ‘superficial’ by anyone. After all, should you expect to be able to win the trust of both shoppers and search engines if there are misspellings or grammatical errors on your site?

In its blog piece, Google presented a number of presentation and production questions that were especially interesting with regard to what could trigger manual penalties or lower algorithmic rankings.

These included “Does the content have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content”, and “Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?”

Comparative

Finally, Google also put forth a few comparative questions, focused on how well a site compares to its rivals in terms of quality.

It’s well worth bearing in mind, after all, that your site doesn’t need to be perfect to achieve strong rankings – it just needs to be better than the sites it’s competing with for certain keyword phrases.

Is SEO quality a subject that has been concerning you as you look to optimise your site for better rankings in the months and years ahead? If so, don’t hesitate to get in touch with the Piranha Designs team.

We provide acclaimed search engine marketing packages that will help your brand to ensure consistently great quality across every key aspect of its presence on the web.

A few ways to better optimise your on-site videos for the search engines

Piranha Designs - Friday, August 02, 2019

It’s probably not news to you that video is becoming an increasingly central element of online marketing and search engine optimisation (SEO) – indeed, there’s an abundance of statistics to suggest precisely this. Did you know, for instance, that 83% of participants in one recent study said video content was gaining in importance, compared to the mere 5% who perceived it was becoming less important?

Despite such figures, however, all too many website owners are still failing to take all of the steps that they can do to optimise their videos for organic search. So, what are some of the measures we would advise you to adopt here at Piranha Designs?

Make sure the topic is actually interesting

When we say ‘interesting’ here, we do – of course – mean ‘interesting’ to your target viewers, rather than necessarily to you. Is the product you’re trying to sell one that the viewer could better appreciate if you provided a 360-degree view of it, or showed it ‘in action’? Or maybe there’s a common problem that you could explain a solution for in video form?

One thing is almost certain – your viewers probably won’t want to see an out-and-out advertisement, unless you’re a household-name brand. Keyword research – as we provide as part of all of our search marketing packages here at Piranha Designs – could be instrumental in enabling you to pick out some suitable video topics.

Produce videos of the highest quality

The term ‘video quality’ can apply to several things, including the literal image and production quality, as well as how well-structured the video content is, and how effective the video is at resolving shoppers’ needs. Whatever – all of these types of ‘quality’ count as far as your SEO is concerned.

Choose an attractive thumbnail

Given that your video’s default thumbnail may not be a very accurate reflection of the entire video, there’s likely to be considerable scope for you to select a thumbnail that is both more attractive and relevant.

If you fail to do this, searchers might not click on your video at all, or they may click on it and immediately leave after a few seconds of watching – and both of these things, if they occur frequently, can have adverse consequences for search engine rankings.

Have a well-structured video section

The structure of your site can play a fundamental role in how quickly its pages are indexed – so why not apply this same lesson to your video SEO, by effectively treating your videos like you would a blog?

Not only can your video pages themselves be optimised with appropriate title tags and relevant descriptions, but they can also each be assigned to a category – again, as routinely happens with blog posts. Also ensure that the category page includes links to every single video page on your site, to make search engine crawlers’ task of navigating your site easier.

Are you on the lookout for an agency that can provide the most in-depth website design and SEO marketing expertise, as part of services that are perfectly matched to your organisation’s needs? If so, we would be pleased to discuss your requirements with you, and how our team could fulfil them; simply call or email us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh today.

How can a great user experience go hand in hand with great SEO?

Piranha Designs - Thursday, July 11, 2019

Are you constantly doing seemingly ‘all of the right things’ with the optimisation of your website for the search engines, only to find the high rankings you’ve worked so hard to achieve aren’t even bringing you a noticeable uplift in sales and loyal customers... that is, if your rankings are even climbing at all?

If so, your big problem may be that you’ve overlooked the crucial connection between user experience – or ‘UX’, as it’s frequently referred to in web design and development circles – and SEO.

You see, the two things have a very intimate relationship. Just imagine having two equally renowned high-street stores to choose from for a particular product, with the item being priced the same in both places... except that at one store, the staff are so much nicer, more responsive to your queries and more informative when answering your questions.

In theory, you might still buy the product at the ‘other’ store... but it’s the one that provides an especially great experience that you are especially likely to purchase the item from.

So, how does effect manifest for ecommerce stores?

Let’s continue with the offline analogy for a bit. You go to said brilliant store, you buy the product, you’re satisfied and you go back to that store again and again in the future, consistently benefitting from a brilliant service. You tell your friends and relatives how good this store is, and the store gains such a reputation that it is featured prominently in local directories, newspapers and magazines.

Well, there’s a similar thing going on for online stores that provide a superb user experience.

These sites don’t suffer from such high ‘bounce rates’ – the online store equivalent of someone heading into a shop, and then going straight back out again – while the more pleasurable browsing and buying experience for visitors lends itself to heightened ratings, referrals and inbound links.

A few quick ways to bolster your UX – and with it, your SEO

OK, so you might turn to Piranha Designs to undertake more in-depth optimisation of your site’s user experience – but here are a few quick tips to give you some inspiration and ideas. You might want to try...

  • Ensuring your site’s internal links are to pages that are genuinely relevant and useful for shoppers – there’s little point in linking to the page you’re already on, for example
  • Optimising for faster page loading times, in light of the Google study that showed conversions fell by 12% for every second of load time
  • Giving customers an equally pleasurable experience on mobile and desktop, in recognition of the fact that more than half of Google’s global search results are served from its mobile-first index
  • Going into greater depth with your content. Be careful here – length alone won’t translate into higher rankings, but content that is genuinely more informative and useful for visitors than what your rivals are serving up might well do
  • Targeting keyword themes and words that fit in well with what you’re offering to the customer, instead of being intended purely to drive search volume

Get in touch today with the Piranha Designs team at our Gibraltar, Edinburgh or London offices, and we’d be delighted to talk to you about our website design and SEO services that will help you to maximise your site’s user experience and with it, your brand’s online fortunes.

Introducing the ‘answer box’ – and what it could do for your SEO chances

Piranha Designs - Friday, May 31, 2019

You might think that you’re already doing everything you realistically can to get your ecommerce site to achieve strong positions in the search engine results pages (SERPs). But are you?

In today’s blog post, for instance, we’re taking a closer look at something called the ‘answer box’. It’s the box that you might have noticed at the top of a results page, providing an answer to whatever query you performed a search for.

A quick response to many users’ problems

To give just one example, let’s imagine that you are looking to purchase window film for a building, to better protect occupants and furnishings from solar heat gain and glare at this hotter time of year. You might not be able to easily reach the inside surface of the building’s windows, so you might be wondering whether it’s possible to install window film on the outside surface instead.

So, we Googled “can window films be applied outside”. An answer box popped up at the top of the resultant search page from www.windowtintingco.com, informing us that “the application of window film to the outside surface of some windows may be considered.”

The answer box goes on to provide further relevant information, and a link to the page on the aforementioned website where this text has been taken from.

You, too, can take advantage of these boxes

‘Answer boxes’, then, are a seriously handy feature for users, who might not even need to leave the Google search results page to have their query answered. For the same reasons, they’re also powerful from a search engine optimisation (SEO) perspective for the online businesses that manage to capture them. But with so many ‘how-to’ and other content-rich sites out there, does your humble ecommerce site have much chance of grabbing an answer box or two?

The answer to this question might surprise you. Data from one enterprise platform, for example, shows that the Internet’s 10 most popular shopping sites are collectively eligible to appear in the answer boxes arising from over 453,000 search queries.

But even these ‘elite’ sites – including such household names as eBay, Etsy, Walmart and Home Depot – only actually capture 11 per cent of those answer boxes.

‘Eligibility’, meanwhile, was defined as ranking in the first three positions in Google for a search query that brings up an answer box. The top three was chosen for the threshold because data indicates that 98 per cent of the time, it is one of those three sites that grab the answer box for the given query.

So, what does all of this mean for your online retailer?

What it means is that if you can get your ecommerce site into the top three positions for a query that causes an answer box to spring up, you might well have an extremely good chance of winning it – and reaping the consequent benefits for your brand’s online profile, authority and rankings.

Remember that the content standing the best chance of capturing an answer box is that which answers a question in simple language, in a couple of short lines.

Would you like to investigate the full range of SEO possibilities for your website, and start propelling your business to ever-higher rankings, sales and revenue online? If so, our team here at Piranha Designs is available at the other end of the phone. Get in touch now to discover more about our in-depth search engine marketing expertise and packages.

What’s stopping your mobile site from converting as well as it should?

Piranha Designs - Thursday, May 23, 2019

If your experiences as an online business owner have been anywhere near typical, there’s a good chance that you will have seen the amount of mobile traffic received by your site creep higher and higher. Indeed, it was back in 2016 when mobile page views overtook desktop for almost all websites. Alongside this trend has been a tendency for mobile conversions to also gradually go up.

One other thing the statistics seem to tell us, though, is that customers tend to still prefer desktop and tablet devices for placing those really big orders.

This presents a difficulty if you’ve been focusing a lot lately on optimising your mobile ecommerce site design. If your online retailer’s conversions via mobile seem a little sluggish, what could be causing the problem – and is it even your fault?

Not all causes of poor mobile conversions are easy to address

Fortunately or unfortunately, there are certain things inherent to mobile sites – even the very best ones – that can act like a drag on their conversion rates.

There’s a good chance that a prospective shopper browsing your site via a desktop computer, for instance, is enjoying a faster Internet connection than the typical mobile user. The latter, after all, often access the web on their devices through public Wi-Fi connections. If they were simply sat at home or in the office, many of them would surely use the frequently faster hardwired connections available on their desktop computers instead.

The bigger screens that desktop devices offer over mobile ones can make a big difference as well, as they enable more information to be shared within the visitors’ view, with regard to navigational menus, products and search options alike.

Oh, and mobile users also often just have more distractions to contend with than desktop shoppers, in the form of social media alerts, text notifications and any messages that may come in from other apps installed on their device.

But there are still some things you can do to boost user experience

So, we’ve established a number of issues that can be tricky to overcome as far as bolstering mobile conversions is concerned. But that’s no reason to be fatalistic, given the wide range of measures you can adopt to minimise the impact of these problems.

The speed of your mobile site is certainly imperative, which is why you should go to every length to compress images, scripts, CSS and HTML without adversely affecting other aspects of the user experience.

All manner of ways also exist to optimise category and search results – even just fitting product thumbnails into two columns, to enable visitors to see more options without having to scroll, can make a significant difference.

Oh, and you might also want to look into how you can allow for cross-device and generally more seamless shopping – such as the use of ‘persistent carts’, which retain products that the customer has stored in them for later reference, even if the customer moves away from the site.

Ask us about our high level of mobile website design expertise

The above are by no means the only steps that you might take to refine your mobile website’s effectiveness – so why not contact our capable and seasoned experts today for advice tailored to your own site’s specific requirements?

Get in touch with us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh today for an in-depth discussion about how we could assist you in achieving formidable increases in your mobile conversions this year.

Picture this: tips for optimising images to make them Google-ready

Piranha Designs - Friday, May 03, 2019

In your efforts to carefully tailor your site's on-page text content in such a way that draws Google's positive notice, you could be in danger of overlooking how much of Google's search results pages are now being taken up by imagery. Indeed, Google search results now include images on 34% of occasions.

In just weeks, image results have grown by 42% on the world's most popular search engine, as per a recent study. Those results have increased in both frequency and prominence – about half the time, the images are among the first three positions.

While you may initially see such developments as cause for alarm, SEO has always continued to experiment and adapt over time. For this reason, you should regard the increasingly visual nature of Google search results as an opportunity rather than an obstacle.

Do keywords still come into play with images?

The perhaps surprising answer is that yes, they do. While images lack visible text compared to website pages with their textual content, you can start optimising an image by tweaking its filename, into which you should try to insert unique descriptions and attributes.

For example, if you run an e-commerce site selling swimwear, an image of blue Speedo shorts could be beneficially given the filename blue-speedo-shorts.jpg, as all three elements of that filename could be plausibly inputted into search fields.

Naturally, though, if you sell blue Speedo shorts, you probably sell a very broad range of swimwear, which is where tinkering with the alt tags attached to your images can also prove useful. In these tags, you should mention points of differentiation; for example, the specific colour of the shorts, if you offer them in various hues.

Your website's text copy still plays a part, too

Unexpectedly or otherwise, the visible text near an image on a page can also influence the image's placing in search results. Across captions, product names, descriptive bullets and other textual elements near the image, you shouldn’t neglect to include more details relevant to it.

If you remain unsure as to which keywords should go where when you are optimising your images, our search engine optimisation (SEO) services can steer you in the right direction. We invite you to phone us on (+350) 200 45599 for more information on this point.


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