What should your first steps be when your website is a complete SEO disaster?

Julian Byrne - Monday, June 21, 2021

What should your first steps be when your website is a complete SEO disaster?

 

Now, we know what you might be thinking from our choice of headline: “isn’t that putting it quite strongly?” And it’s true that your website doesn’t have to be an utter catastrophe in the search engine optimisation (SEO) stakes, to still merit a top-to-bottom review of what it does well, and what it does badly – and how the latter may be fixed. 


For this piece, however, we won’t dwell too much on that. Instead, we’ll simply focus on the three most important steps to take when you have a (relatively) blank slate to work with. 


This is a linear process, so make sure you perform the first step before moving onto the second, and then the third. 


  1. Help search engine bots to do their job 


We won’t dwell too much here on precisely why you might consider your site to be an SEO disaster; nonetheless, if you’re really struggling to get your pages appearing in the search rankings, it’s worth considering whether your site could be presenting difficult obstacles to search bots. 


By “search bots”, we’re referring to the bots that search engines send around the web, their job being to ‘crawl’ the web and find new sites and pages to ‘index’ in the search results.   


Things like accidental noindex tags, uncrawlable links and robots.txt malfunctions could all be compromising these bots’ ability to crawl and index your site for inclusion on the search engine results pages (SERPs). 


If this sounds like something that could be an issue for your site, why not get in touch with the Piranha Designs team now to request a technical review? 


  1. Communicate your site’s relevance to search engines 


How do you do this? Well, you don’t write Google a letter… instead, it’s about sending what are known as ‘relevance signals’ to the search bots, indicating that your site’s content is relevant to the needs of particular searchers. 


There’s no stronger organic relevance signal than content relevance. Sure enough, search engine bots try to understand the purpose and meaning of the pages they discover online, so that they can then present those pages in the rankings for relevant search queries.  


Using the most relevant keywords, then, remains crucial for online business owners trying to attract the right people to their site by ranking for the right queries. By “keywords”, we’re talking about those words and phrases that actual human beings search for, whether it’s “letting agents in Manchester” or “restaurants in Gibraltar”. 


Such is the importance of keyword research to getting a site’s SEO right, that it is a fundamental part of all four of our SEO marketing packages here at Piranha Designs. So, don’t be afraid to ask us about any of them. 


  1. Amplify your site’s authority and relevance 


If you’ve thoroughly completed the previous two steps – with or without the assistance of Piranha Designs’ search marketing experts – you should have put in place strong foundations for your site’s long-lasting SEO success. 


However, it’s one thing to send out relevance signals, which serve as that initial ‘radio signal’… and quite another thing to ‘amplify’ that signal. We’re talking about making the signal louder. 


In the past, the accumulation of backlinks – links from other sites to your own site – would have been your very top priority when it came to ‘amplifying’ your site’s relevance and authority. 


Link building is still important, but it’s also true that content relevance has overtaken it as a ranking signal in the past few years. And such factors as your site’s navigation system and internal links will also greatly shape its effectiveness at amplifying its signal. 


There are ‘good ways’ and ‘bad ways’ to do both link building and content marketing. So, it’s important to avoid falling into the traps that could cause you to actually harm your site’s SEO performance, instead of helping it. 


That’s another strong reason to consider getting in touch with professionals, such as our own. Reach out to us in Gibraltar, London, Edinburgh or Spain today, and we will be pleased to advise and assist you, so that you make all of your right moves for your site’s online marketing and SEO. 



Using more impactful headlines on your product pages can help you increase sales

Julian Byrne - Monday, May 10, 2021


Using more impactful headlines on your product pages can help you increase sales 


You might initially think it’s obvious what the “headline” is for a given product page on your e-tail site; surely, it’s just the actual name of the product? Well, actually, it isn’t – or at least, not necessarily. 


After all, there are quite a few reasons why you might not want to just stick with a product’s name for each of your product pages. For one thing, unless the product is exclusive to your store, you’ll almost certainly be competing in the search engine rankings with other stores offering the same item. And those rivals might be making the product available at a lower price. 


Even if the above aren’t factors, a compelling headline can be key to grabbing customers’ attention and instantly giving them a sense of why they might desire the product. 


At the time of this article being written, for example, Apple was showcasing various products on its homepage, with compelling titles such as – in the case of AirTags – “Lose your knack for losing things”, and for the Apple Watch, “The future of health is on your wrist.” 


There’s an art to writing a great product headline 


Of course, if you’re reading this, your brand presumably isn’t Apple. But even well-known brands often fall into classic traps when writing headline copy for their sites. 


They might use specialised jargon and acronyms, for instance, that non-specialists don’t immediately understand – thereby immediately narrowing their audience. Or they might focus too much on features of the product, and not enough on the real-world benefits such features would have for the person buying. 


The good news is that you don’t need an Apple-sized marketing budget to avoid oversights like the above with the headlines on your product pages and landing pages. It’s just a case of remembering, and applying, some simple principles. 


A good starting point when coming up with product headline copy is to imagine what you’d write if you were coming up with text for a blog post or even advertising billboard showcasing this product. What are the very first things you’d want to say? 


In devising potential headlines for the given product, ask yourself why the customer would need or want this product – what problems would the item solve for them? Consider, too, what features of the product will be most important for making the buyer’s life pleasanter or easier, bearing in mind what the actual target audience is likely to be. 


Contemplate, as well, what the true value of the product is to the purchaser. We recently touched on this very subject on the Piranha Designs blog, and it’s not just the price we’re referring to here, but also its functionality, durability and longevity. 


If your headline can help convince the would-be customer that this is a quality product that will bring value to their lives for a while to come, they’ll probably be prepared to buy it at a higher price than they otherwise would have been. 


We can assist with your brand’s all-round digital marketing 


There’s naturally a lot more to learn about how to craft product-page headlines that will actually convert. That includes making sure you use simple words, and getting straight to the point about the benefits that customers can expect from the given product. 


Here at Piranha Designs, though, we aren’t just about the optimisation of your on-site copy – we’re also firmly focused on providing the website design and other digital marketing services that most help brands like yours. 


Contact us now via phone or email to discuss the possibilities for how we could work together to allow your organisation to get more out of its online presence. 


What’s actually motivating your online store’s target shoppers?

Julian Byrne - Friday, February 12, 2021

A lot of online business owners may feel that they already know whether they sell experiences or physical things. After all, if your firm doesn’t specialise in obvious ‘experiences’ such as holiday packages to Tenerife or driving days that involve blasting a supercar around Silverstone, and instead sells electrical goods such as TVs and laptops, you might think the answer’s pretty clear.

But actually, the true situation might not be so clear – and this can have major implications for how you market what your business does sell, including how you respond to customer concerns.

What is my target customer looking to accomplish?

The above is a big, big question that any business – online or offline – needs to ask themselves regularly.

When it comes down to it, even if – for instance – your store deals solely in electrical items like those mentioned above, it’s not really the items themselves, or even the finer points of their technical specifications, that you’re ultimately selling. What you’re ultimately selling to the customer, is happiness.

Yes, you read that correctly: happiness. Whether your store sells products or ‘experiences’, every store is essentially trying to sell positive and happy experiences.

The customer is approaching your business with a certain need, problem or unhappiness about something, and they’re looking to solve that issue. There’s something that they specifically want to accomplish, and they’ll want to know how your brand can help them to make it a reality.

Let’s look at the aforementioned example of TVs. Your brand might offer impressive 4K Ultra HD widescreen TVs, with pre-loaded streaming apps like Netflix and YouTube. But the customer might be looking for a TV that is available for a certain price, and that has a built-in DVD player, to enable them to watch DVDs for TV programmes and movies that might not be available on Netflix.

You (hopefully) get the idea. Simply reeling off “industry-leading” technical features on your site’s landing and product pages won’t necessarily get you very far, if you don’t understand what the customer is looking to accomplish, and the experience they want to have with whatever product they might eventually buy from you.

You’re selling feelings – so make sure you ask the right questions

Keeping to the TV theme, just think of all of the experiences your favourite TV shows and films bring you... the raw thrills, the sentimental appeal, whatever they happen to be. These experiences are what your brand is ultimately selling, even if you’re handing the customer a box containing something made out of metal and plastic.

However, not all of your online store’s target customers will necessarily be able to easily explain what they do need from a product, so it will also be important to ask questions that tease these needs out. Simply asking them “what do you need to do or solve?” can be a great starting point.

But depending on the product category in question, you might also quiz the customer on their circumstances, activities and preferences. This will help you to narrow down the options so that the shopper purchases and benefits from a product that does give them the experiences they desire.

Remember that a customer whose ‘pain points’ are comprehensively answered by your store’s products, is likelier to be one who continues buying from you for months and years into the future – and they’re likelier to spread a positive word about you to others, too.

For a free no-obligation discussion of your own brand’s needs in relation to website design or other digital marketing services, don’t wait any longer to reach out to the Piranha Designs team.

How can your ecommerce store boost its customer retention rate in 2021?

Julian Byrne - Tuesday, January 12, 2021

The retail industry took a hit at the start of the pandemic – and, in a fashion, continues to do so as many companies are forced to keep their brick-and-mortar stores temporarily shut in line with lockdown restrictions. In sharp contrast, however, the COVID-19 era presents the world of ecommerce with a huge opportunity for growth.

Still, a big question is whether your online store can ensure what may have been its pandemic-sparked expansion lasts well into this New Year.

Regardless of how long the pandemic itself lingers in 2021, here are several strategies you could pursue to help keep your company’s ecommerce growth going.

Use the RFM model

The recency, frequency and monetary value (RFM) model enables you to classify customers on account of their shopping behaviour. One way to put it into practice is by assigning each of your customers a score from 1 to 5 on the measures of how recently they have bought, how often and the average monetary value of their orders.

So, a customer who scores 555 should probably be in line for VIP treatment, while one with a 255 score may be tempted back to your online shop by an automated email or text message.

Use customer onboarding to build relationships

Customer onboarding can work with both new customers and those whose transactional habits at your online store have waned. In either instance, though, your objective would be to foster a relationship that encourages the customer to buy repeatedly from you in the longer term.

So, while onboarding for a new customer might involve them registering an account with your online store and subscribing to its content, trying to win back a former customer could entail messaging them privately to thank them for their last order and offering them a discount code redeemable on a future order.

Regularly publish fresh content to keep shoppers... content

How many times have you seen, in your email inbox, a message focused on a specific product? The mere sight of this kind of message has probably made you think “not spam again”. That’s why your marketing campaigns can’t be limited to product-specific pieces like these.

While it would not always be of the best use to your customers, content that touches on pain points in their everyday lives would come across as much less self-publicising. This content can comprise articles and videos, for which we can help you to select the right keywords.

Keyword research and guest blogging are among the services we include as standard with our search engine marketing (SEM) packages here at Piranha Designs. We can help you to choose between our Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum packages if you directly reach out to us in the UK or Gibraltar.

The lessons learned from the UK’s first ‘COVID-19 Christmas’

Julian Byrne - Friday, January 08, 2021

Yes, we know what you’re thinking; that reference to “first” is not an encouraging one. Nonetheless, no matter how long the coronavirus crisis lasts, the fact remains that we’ve learned a lot about the state of retail – online and offline, in the UK and beyond – over the last nine months.

Those lessons, in turn, can have implications for how you choose to tweak your brand’s e-tail presence during the year to come.

Some figures in relation to customer habits over the last few months are, of course, still filtering through. But on the basis of what we do already know, let’s look at some of the insights and conclusions we can draw from the ‘COVID Christmas’ just finished.

Ecommerce is (predictably) thriving

While it has to be the least revelatory development of the UK’s coronavirus-affected festive season, it’s worth reminding ourselves just how drastically the pandemic has helped to accelerate an existing drift towards online shopping.

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), Internet sales as a percentage of total retail sales had already long been on the up. The first nationwide lockdown, however, vaulted this percentage from 19.1% in February to 32.9% in May. For November – the month coinciding with the autumn lockdown in England – a new peak of 36% was achieved.

December saw the return of the tiered system of restrictions and the widespread reopening of non-essential retail on our high streets; it’s no wonder, then, that the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)’s monthly retail sales balance increased to -3 for that month.

The outlook for January, however, was a much bleaker -33. With much of England having been placed under tougher tier 4 rules for the New Year – bringing about the closure once more of non-essential retail – the ecommerce surge looks likely to continue well into 2021. That could mean even more opportunities for brands that have been optimising their online sales arms since March.

Not all e-tailers and product categories will have automatically done well

Unfortunately, some small businesses that attempted to maximise their online sales during the Christmas season are likely to have learned this particular lesson the hard way.

The fact is that even with the above apparent bonanza in ecommerce opportunities, COVID-19 didn’t just force us online – it also altered our buying habits, including in relation to Christmas gifts.

EBay data cited by CNBC, for example, indicated that gym equipment, board games and jigsaw puzzles saw strong sales in the UK in the run-up to the November lockdown. It therefore seems logical to expect such ‘indoorsy’ items to have been well-represented among popular gifts for Christmas 2020.

So, which product categories may have struggled during the festive period just gone, even for online sellers? Jonathan Pritchard, retail analyst at Peel Hunt, has suggested that “clothing faces the biggest problems because people are not going to Christmas parties”.

Keeping hold of customers is no less important than acquiring them

This particular insight isn’t likely to be a new one to a lot of the more experienced ecommerce brands. For those, however, who may have largely depended on a brick-and-mortar retail presence, only to be forced to largely switch their focus to online selling from March onwards, it’s a key mantra to take into 2021.

What are the key elements an ecommerce product page should have?

Julian Byrne - Monday, December 21, 2020

Whatever components you place on a product detail page in your online store, you will wish them to form an engrossing, cohesive whole that helps inform your customers’ buying decisions.

Here, then, is a rundown of the elements you ought to include as standard on each of your ecommerce site’s pages that focus on a given product from the store’s inventory.

Photography

Naturally, when shopping online, customers can’t physically handle a product and turn it over like they would have the option of doing in a traditional brick-and-mortar store.

That’s why each of your product pages should include an array of photos – we would advise about six to eight – that capture the item from multiple different angles.

A price and call to action

The “call to action”, in this instance, would refer to that trusty “buy now” or “add to basket” button – which you would obviously wish to tempt the shopper to click.

As one major factor that could sway the buyer in that direction is the product’s price, you should display this prominently – possibly right near the call-to-action button.

A written description and specifications

Somebody somewhere might have coined the phrase “a picture is worth a thousand words”, but they certainly didn’t own an online store. Besides, you wouldn’t want as many as a thousand words in the textual description and specifications you include on a product page.

That’s because those descriptions should be punchy, specific and easy to understand. In other words, they should get straight to the point – although you should still be careful to include relevant keywords, which our SEO marketing experts can help you to research.

Reviews

Of course, you wouldn’t write these yourself but instead invite customers to do so. However, these reviews should still be given a special space on your product page, as they can constitute a form of “social proof” that backs up your own claims about the item.

Even if it’s a relatively new product that has attracted few reviews so far on your site, those reviews can play a big part in telling the product’s story.

Are you unsure about any aspect of optimising your e-tail store’s product pages to appeal more strongly to shoppers and search engine spiders alike? If so, don’t forget that the friendly and professional Piranha Designs team is always available for a chat when you get in touch with us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh.

How your online store can get its Christmas social media approach just right

Julian Byrne - Thursday, December 10, 2020

You might be thinking it’s a little late for us to be telling you every detail of how you should plan your e-tail shop’s festive-season social media strategy, and you’d be right. Hopefully, you’ll have the key planks of such seasonal plans put down already.

However, it might still be handy for you to do a ‘check-up’ of your brand’s approach to social media this Christmas, before you launch the full campaign in earnest.

So, here are some of the key factors to be thinking about – or reminding yourself of – at this late stage.

Is your brand’s social media campaign well-aligned with its broader goals?

Whatever your business’s goals are for its social media channels, now is the time to re-familiarise yourself with them, as you’re planning your posts on the likes of Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for the month or so ahead.

And of course, those goals may well differ from platform to platform. It might be that your brand has a presence on certain social media sites largely to increase brand awareness, while on others, you may be seeking to distribute authoritative and useful content for your target audience, or to acquire new customers.

Whatever – you need to be sure of what your e-tailer’s precise goals are for each social platform, and to plan your seasonal social posts accordingly.

In the process, do what you can to make those goals SMART – specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound.

What is your social editorial calendar looking like?

The above goals will all be important when you’re putting together an editorial calendar for your brand’s social media presence. Such an editorial calendar should consist of a list of exactly what will be published on each of your social channels, and when.

By now, you ought to have this publishing plan already set out for the rest of 2020. So, have another look now at the mix of what you intend to post.

Does your editorial calendar look a little too heavy on one type of content, for example – such as memes or links to ‘how to’ blog articles – when considered alongside your aforementioned broader goals and the audience you have on that given social media channel?

Do you have a strong sense of who your audience is?

Every social network on which your brand is present should provide insightful statistics about your audience. So, before your Christmas social media marketing campaign gets significantly underway, it’s well worth spending a few minutes checking whether the actual audience you’re addressing on your social profiles is consistent with the one you think you’re aiming at.

If your store sells men’s products, for instance, you may be surprised by how strongly women are represented in your follower base on a specific platform like Facebook.

There are several reasons why this may arise. Your Facebook updates may not be very well-matched to what social content men are looking for in your sector, or your products might be largely purchased by women as gifts for the men in their lives.

You can determine what the situation is for your own brand by keeping a close eye on the demographics of your social followers on specific platforms, encompassing their age, gender, location, occupation and interests – among other things. This will then have implications for the exact social content that you produce.

Here at Piranha Designs, we provide social setup expertise as part of our top-level Platinum search engine optimisation and marketing package. It’s one of the key elements that will help you to get your ecommerce outlet noticed for the right reasons online. So, why wait any longer to talk about it with our UK and Gibraltar-based web marketing professionals?

3 ideas for your e-tail store’s content marketing this December

Julian Byrne - Tuesday, November 17, 2020

You won’t need our team here at Piranha Designs to tell you that this December won’t be like just any old December. While we wait to see to what extent a vaguely ‘normal’ Christmas might be possible amid the coronavirus pandemic, you should now be contemplating the implications of this for your brand’s content marketing strategy for the month ahead. 

Here, then, are three suggestions for the kind of content you might look to create in December 2020. 

Rising to life’s challenges in the COVID era 

2020 will be remembered for lots of things. The biggest, though, will be COVID-19, for the simple reason that it really has been all-pervasive, upending pretty much all of our lives. And with the winter having brought new lockdown conditions, now could be a great time to put out coronavirus-themed content related in some way to what your brand offers. 

A store that specialises in kitchen supplies, for instance, might produce an article or two this month on cooking with the family. Or maybe you run a health food store – in which case, you may write a few pieces on the products you stock that might support immunity and reduce your purchasers’ chances of catching a cold or flu. 

Your organisation’s social conscience 

Have your staff been helping to fundraise or provide products or services to the community throughout the tumult the pandemic has brought? If so, the festive period could be a great time to draw attention to it, and even give a ‘round-up’ of your brand’s charitable activities throughout the past year. 

After all, research has indicated that consumers are much likelier to buy from brands that they consider to have a strong purpose – as well as to defend those brands and refer them to friends and relatives. And in this season of goodwill, you’ll want to communicate that your own brand’s purpose is about so much more than its bottom line. 

Teaching skills to at-home customers 

With so many of us once again stuck indoors right now, it should be no great surprise that a lot of brands are appealing to those who are using their enforced at-home time to learn new skills. 

This will be an especially easy route to take with your content marketing if your store sells items that obviously require skill from the people using them – even more so if those items are likely to be strong Christmas sellers. 

That could mean a store that sells musical instruments publishing a ‘how to’ guide for playing the violin, or an art materials store outlining landscape painting tips for its blog readers. 

Or you may run a store that specialises in vinyl records and record players, in which case, you might blog about how to set up a turntable. Or maybe your car parts store could provide instructions on the process of changing the oil in a vehicle? You get the idea; ‘skills’-based content can be applicable to more online stores’ content strategies than you might first think. 

If you aren’t confident about your abilities to create your own compelling content or simply lack the time to do so amid the Christmas rush, why not get in touch with Piranha Designs? We can provide blog writing and guest blogging services as part of our broader search engine marketing solutions, and we would be delighted to hear from you when you reach out to us.

Will Black Friday sales be such a big deal this year?

Julian Byrne - Friday, November 06, 2020

We’re into November, and we’re sure you’ll know what that means – the return of the now-traditional Black Friday. Falling on the Friday after Thanksgiving Day in the United States – which means that this year, it’ll be 27th November – Black Friday has become one of the most hyped shopping days on the calendar. 

But as you’ll also know, 2020 isn’t just another year. It’s seen upheaval at a level few of us have ever known, with likely knock-on effects for how we shop in the run-up to Christmas, too. 

You might have reason to rethink your Black Friday strategy in 2020 

We all know that 2020 has been a rocky year for brick-and-mortar stores forced to temporarily close for periods of lockdown, and to impose enhanced hygiene and social distancing measures on their premises when permitted to open. So, it would seem that the now-familiar Black Friday scrums are already firmly off the menu this year. 

Combine this with the fact that the latest England-wide lockdown is set to run – at the time of typing – at least until early December, and it’s clear that large chunks of the UK’s retail premises will be off-bounds to pretty much any shoppers at all this Black Friday. 

But even if these lockdown restrictions were not being imposed, there would be good reason to expect a more subdued Black Friday this year. 

That’s because many in retail are also eager to alleviate the stress the pandemic has already exerted on supply chains and delivery services. This is leading to a greater emphasis on season-long deals, rather than necessarily making a big fuss out of a single day or weekend. 

If shoppers can be encouraged to commit to their Christmas purchases earlier than Black Friday, there can be greater certainty about ecommerce stores having adequate stock, and customers receiving their ordered items in good time. 

A season-wide approach is likely to serve your store best this Christmas 

Of course, we don’t expect Black Friday to ‘go away’ completely as a big shopping event, just because of COVID-19 – a cursory search of Google News should be enough to confirm that. 

Nonetheless, it seems that of all years, 2020 will be a year to focus on such broader strategies as launching your ecommerce outlet’s Christmas sales early, refreshing your discount offers on a week-by-week basis, promoting products of particular relevance to those staying at home, and clearly communicating likely delivery times at this time of possibly widespread delays. 

In short, this won’t be ‘just another’ Christmas shopping season – and while you probably realised that already, you’ll need your store’s approach to Black Friday to reflect it. Reach out to the Piranha Designs team today, and we’ll be pleased to further advise and assist you with your Yuletide and New Year digital marketing, website design and related services. 

How to get more of your casual visitors actually buying

Julian Byrne - Friday, October 23, 2020

While, here at Piranha Designs, we would certainly emphasise the importance of effective search engine optimisation (SEO) for attracting relevant traffic to your online store, the fact remains that it’s one thing to drive visitors, and another thing to get those visitors to become paying customers.

Don’t forget that a lot of your ecommerce store’s visitors won’t see your homepage first, but will instead land on a product page or even blog post via a Google search for a relevant term. They therefore won’t necessarily have any particular loyalty or affinity for your brand, or even recognise your brand... let alone know about your broader product range, promotions or brand values. 

So, how can you transform more of those only-vaguely-interested visitors into people reaching for their debit card when on one of your product pages? Here are some proven strategies.

Don’t depend on brand recognition alone

Sure, some visitors to your e-tail site, even from the moment you set up your store, may be people familiar with your brand’s brick-and-mortar shop – if you have one – or they may know the product brands you carry.

For a very significant proportion of those people you’re trying to convert into buyers, though, none of the above will be the case. So, you can’t rely solely on customers being drawn to a particular brand, whether it’s your own or the ones of the items you stock. 

A particular danger of a more brand-centric approach to the structuring and optimisation of your website, is that you might miss out on sales from those searching for specific product types or features, rather than brands.

Give the customer reasons to feel confident about you

While brands that are literally Apple or Coca-Cola might not need that many “proof points” to instil faith among prospective shoppers, we’re presuming your own store’s brand is nothing like as prominent. Imagine landing on a page of your site while not being familiar with your brand at all – would you buy from here?

The answer’s much likelier to be “yes” is you were to see immediately understandable signs of trustworthiness, such as an “about us” page to show the human face of your business, and a phone number to indicate your customers can easily contact you about anything.

A ‘live chat’ feature and the logos of any relevant industry accreditations or certifications could also really help to drum in the impression that your brand is thoroughly reputable and here to stay.

Make it easy for shoppers to choose

It’ll hopefully go without saying for you that the more barriers you can remove to someone buying from you, the likelier they will probably be to do so.

If, as we’ve covered above, a given would-be buyer doesn’t know your brand, the chances are that they might not know your specific products well, either... and that could make it difficult for them to select the item that would best suit them.

Wrong choices are bad news for both the buyer, who will likely be frustrated as a result, and the store, which will have to handle any associated returns.

So, it’s in your interests to do everything possible to make choosing easy, first time out. That might mean including size guides, product comparison charts, help icons, and all of the specification details the customer will need to make the most informed buying choice.

With our search engine marketing (SEM) services here at Piranha Designs encompassing such key elements as keyword research, page optimisation, guest blogging and more, we can leave your store well-placed to heighten the proportion of casual visitors you convert into buyers. Feel free to contact us via phone or email for further information.


Recent Posts


Tags


Archive

Follow Us

We’d love to hear from you and answer any questions you may have.
Send us an email, stay in touch and follow us on facebook/twitter/linkedin.