What’s stopping your mobile site from converting as well as it should?

Piranha Designs - Thursday, May 23, 2019

If your experiences as an online business owner have been anywhere near typical, there’s a good chance that you will have seen the amount of mobile traffic received by your site creep higher and higher. Indeed, it was back in 2016 when mobile page views overtook desktop for almost all websites. Alongside this trend has been a tendency for mobile conversions to also gradually go up.

One other thing the statistics seem to tell us, though, is that customers tend to still prefer desktop and tablet devices for placing those really big orders.

This presents a difficulty if you’ve been focusing a lot lately on optimising your mobile ecommerce site design. If your online retailer’s conversions via mobile seem a little sluggish, what could be causing the problem – and is it even your fault?

Not all causes of poor mobile conversions are easy to address

Fortunately or unfortunately, there are certain things inherent to mobile sites – even the very best ones – that can act like a drag on their conversion rates.

There’s a good chance that a prospective shopper browsing your site via a desktop computer, for instance, is enjoying a faster Internet connection than the typical mobile user. The latter, after all, often access the web on their devices through public Wi-Fi connections. If they were simply sat at home or in the office, many of them would surely use the frequently faster hardwired connections available on their desktop computers instead.

The bigger screens that desktop devices offer over mobile ones can make a big difference as well, as they enable more information to be shared within the visitors’ view, with regard to navigational menus, products and search options alike.

Oh, and mobile users also often just have more distractions to contend with than desktop shoppers, in the form of social media alerts, text notifications and any messages that may come in from other apps installed on their device.

But there are still some things you can do to boost user experience

So, we’ve established a number of issues that can be tricky to overcome as far as bolstering mobile conversions is concerned. But that’s no reason to be fatalistic, given the wide range of measures you can adopt to minimise the impact of these problems.

The speed of your mobile site is certainly imperative, which is why you should go to every length to compress images, scripts, CSS and HTML without adversely affecting other aspects of the user experience.

All manner of ways also exist to optimise category and search results – even just fitting product thumbnails into two columns, to enable visitors to see more options without having to scroll, can make a significant difference.

Oh, and you might also want to look into how you can allow for cross-device and generally more seamless shopping – such as the use of ‘persistent carts’, which retain products that the customer has stored in them for later reference, even if the customer moves away from the site.

Ask us about our high level of mobile website design expertise

The above are by no means the only steps that you might take to refine your mobile website’s effectiveness – so why not contact our capable and seasoned experts today for advice tailored to your own site’s specific requirements?

Get in touch with us in Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh today for an in-depth discussion about how we could assist you in achieving formidable increases in your mobile conversions this year.

Are you overlooking the importance of unique product descriptions?

Piranha Designs - Monday, May 06, 2019

It’s curious, in many ways, that product descriptions seem to be a ‘blind spot’ for a large proportion of ecommerce businesses. By ‘blind spot’, we’re referring to the fact that so few such product descriptions seem to be unique, despite it being widely recognised how much harm content duplicated from elsewhere can do to a site’s search engine rankings.

After all, when multiple pages have the same content, competition is created between those pages that damages the chances of any of them ranking in the search engine results.

However, we’re normally used to talking about duplicate content as content that repeats itself across a single site. Many of us aren’t so accustomed to discussing the problem of syndicated product descriptions also producing duplicate content across the web as a whole – or more specifically, giving your site the same on-page content as its ecommerce rivals.

So, what has led to this unfortunate situation, and what can be done about it?

The role of the major brands and manufacturers

Let’s imagine that your brand is one of the world’s biggest, such as Adidas. It’s likely that you won’t feel you have much to lose from resellers using your product content, given that your own site is likely to have almost unparalleled link authority and contextual relevance for your products.

In any case, of course Google is almost certainly going to rank you higher for online searches of your products, than the thousands of retailers stocking them. Yours is the megabrand, after all.

Retailers can reap major rewards from composing their own content

Now, if you’re a relatively small ecommerce business using syndicated content from these megabrands for their products, you might initially imagine it to be too big a risk, or otherwise problematic, to have unique content created for your product descriptions.

What if, for instance, you accidentally misrepresent a product in a description that you write, and find yourself receiving a heightened number of customer support queries, complaints and returns as a result? Plus, it can be very costly in terms of time and money to keep on creating such unique descriptions for all of the products that you are likely to be continually adding to your site.

However, given that the highest-ranking ecommerce businesses are consistently those with unique product descriptions – not merely reworded, but actually with innovative and fresh angles compared to whatever basic information the brand has already provided – it makes sense to look seriously at creating such content for your own site.

Your unique product descriptions might go into greater detail about the historical context of each product than the standard syndicated copy does, or they may clearly and plainly outline the benefits of certain technology that the given product uses. Blocks of text may also be converted into bullet points for easier reading.

You don’t need to look far for help with your brand’s online presence

Are you interested in investigating further with us how our team here at Piranha Designs can assist you in realising the maximum potential from your site’s ecommerce web design and SEO marketing? If so, we’re available on the other end of the phone; simply get in touch with us at our Gibraltar, London or Edinburgh offices today for more information.

Picture this: tips for optimising images to make them Google-ready

Piranha Designs - Friday, May 03, 2019

In your efforts to carefully tailor your site's on-page text content in such a way that draws Google's positive notice, you could be in danger of overlooking how much of Google's search results pages are now being taken up by imagery. Indeed, Google search results now include images on 34% of occasions.

In just weeks, image results have grown by 42% on the world's most popular search engine, as per a recent study. Those results have increased in both frequency and prominence – about half the time, the images are among the first three positions.

While you may initially see such developments as cause for alarm, SEO has always continued to experiment and adapt over time. For this reason, you should regard the increasingly visual nature of Google search results as an opportunity rather than an obstacle.

Do keywords still come into play with images?

The perhaps surprising answer is that yes, they do. While images lack visible text compared to website pages with their textual content, you can start optimising an image by tweaking its filename, into which you should try to insert unique descriptions and attributes.

For example, if you run an e-commerce site selling swimwear, an image of blue Speedo shorts could be beneficially given the filename blue-speedo-shorts.jpg, as all three elements of that filename could be plausibly inputted into search fields.

Naturally, though, if you sell blue Speedo shorts, you probably sell a very broad range of swimwear, which is where tinkering with the alt tags attached to your images can also prove useful. In these tags, you should mention points of differentiation; for example, the specific colour of the shorts, if you offer them in various hues.

Your website's text copy still plays a part, too

Unexpectedly or otherwise, the visible text near an image on a page can also influence the image's placing in search results. Across captions, product names, descriptive bullets and other textual elements near the image, you shouldn’t neglect to include more details relevant to it.

If you remain unsure as to which keywords should go where when you are optimising your images, our search engine optimisation (SEO) services can steer you in the right direction. We invite you to phone us on (+350) 200 45599 for more information on this point.


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